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Convince funders to support you by developing your Asking Rights

Posted By Kris H. Rutledge, CausePlanet, Wednesday, June 1, 2016

How do you reach higher-level investors to sustain your nonprofit?

What if emotional appeals aren't enough? How can you get funders to truly invest in your nonprofit for the long-term? 

Tom Ralser, after spending more than two decades working in and with nonprofits, witnessed the nearly exclusive use of emotional appeals.

 

But now times have changed.  

 

Higher-level donors (investors) are more interested in outcomes and investing over time in nonprofits. In Ralser's book, Asking Rights: Why Some Nonprofits Get Funded (and Some Don't), he guides you through the process of developing your Asking Rights to convince investors to fund you for a more sustainable future.

Webinar with Tom Ralser

Join CausePlanet founder Denise McMahan and Tom Ralser Wednesday, July 13, at 11:00 Central Time at a webinar interview at your desk.

 

Ralser will touch on the following topics:

  • How is an investor different in his approach to your organization?
  • How can you appeal both to higher-level investors and smaller donors?
  • How do you establish your Asking Rights?
  • How do you use your Asking Rights to attract investors?

 Register

 

Register now for this FREE interview for all LANO members. (The link requires LANO network sign-in to register.)

 

See more

 

See more with the Page to Practice™ summary of Ralser’s book:

 

·      Simply log in at the top right corner of CausePlanet’s home page (www.causeplanet.org) and fill in your registered email with LANO and “Password1”.

·      Click on “Summary Library” to see Asking Rights and more titles.

Tags:  author webinars  CausePlanet  Page to Practice 

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What Should We Do Now to Prepare for the New Overtime Rule Change?

Posted By Renee Farrell, SPHR, CCP- Think HR, Thursday, May 26, 2016

Let’s face it — it could have been worse for employers. Yesterday’s blog post outlined the provisions of the final rule with changes to the federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) salary threshold for overtime exemption, from $455 per week or $23,660 annually to $913 per week or $47,476 annually. The bad news for employers is that the overtime pay rate doubled.

There is some better news for employers, though:

  • It is less than the original proposed rate announced last fall of $50,440 annually.
  • There are no changes to the duties tests under the FLSA.
  • Up to 10 percent of nondiscretionary bonuses can be included in the annual salary calculation.
  • The final rule’s effective date has been extended to December 1, 2016 to give employers more time to prepare.

Don’t panic, but start planning. Try to look at this as a “gift” to address past wage and hour issues without calling attention to them.

Financial Preparations

Analyze the salaries of employees who may be affected by the final rule and start forecasting for increased salaries and overtime costs. Suggestions include:

  1. Determine which employees are exempt at an annual pay rate of less than $47,476, including up to 10 percent of nondiscretionary bonuses.
  2. Consider whether to raise these employees’ pay to meet the new threshold of $47,476 to maintain exempt status or budget for potential additional overtime expenses with the reclassification to nonexempt status.
  3. Review with your managers or exempt staff the average hours that each employee in the above group works beyond 40 hours per week, or other state hours worked requirement triggering overtime eligibility. Don’t forget to include meal and rest periods, travel time, training time, and other hidden overtime in that analysis.
  4. Calculate the average number of overtime hours of your current nonexempt workers on an annual basis.
  5. Based on these two numbers (from steps 2 and 3 above), determine the average number of hours that would be considered as overtime (over 40 hours in a workweek, or eight hours in a day for some states) for the exempt workers; the aggregate of both is an estimated average of overtime hours that the exempt worker may work if reclassified as nonexempt.
  6. To calculate the overtime budget, take the average hourly rate of all exempt workers at the annual rate of less than $47,476, multiply the hourly rate by 1.5, and multiply that number by the estimated average overtime hours calculated in the last step to determine the proposed overtime budget for the current exempt workers that may be reclassified as nonexempt.

Consider requiring exempt employees earning less than $47,476 per year to start tracking their weekly hours worked. Since exempt employees do not typically record their work hours, it may be difficult for them to accurately estimate the overtime hours they have worked and anticipate working in the future. Having them track their work hours will provide the employer with valuable information when it comes to budgeting.

Benefits Preparations

Review your group benefits plans and your paid time off and leave policies (for example, sick and vacation) and assess how each may be impacted as they pertain to eligibility and accrual differences for exempt and nonexempt workers and how the company will best manage the transition from one accrual method to another. For example, if an exempt worker accrues based on weeks worked up to three weeks of paid time off (PTO) a year, but a nonexempt worker will only accrue for hours worked up to two weeks of PTO a year, the company may experience frustrated workers and face retention concerns due to a loss in benefits under the leave policy.

Communications Preparations

Plan your communications strategy carefully. This is a great opportunity to talk with your employees about your pay strategy and what your organization values, and you can reinforce that the regulatory definitions of overtime exemption status are not important to your evaluation of each employee’s worth to your organization.

Keep in mind that many exempt employees view earning a salary as a rite of passage — a declaration of their professional status. Notifying an individual that he or she will now be required to “punch a timeclock” will require some forethought and finesse to ensure that the message is not interpreted as a demotion or as a loss of status. The employee’s perception of this change in classification will be amplified if these employees are no longer able to work the longer hours that had allowed them to feel a part of significant business contributions.

You may also have to consider whether you need to make any structural changes in your organization to reflect having exempt and nonexempt employees with similar job titles and duties or amend policies that once applied only to exempt supervisory positions. How you communicate those changes will set the tone for discussions regarding organizational goals and objectives and each employee’s contribution to those goals.

Address the perception that nonexempt status leads to a loss of flexibility in scheduling. You may still be able to offer the same flexibility for work schedules as you have in the past, but employees will need to account for the time that they are working and not working during the regular work day, which is the change that may require the most adaptation. Review your policies to determine the level of schedule flexibility that may be permitted for nonexempt staff. In many organizations, exempt employees have the flexibility of coming in and leaving as they choose, as long as their work gets done. However, for those who will become nonexempt, the hours in which the employee is not working is unpaid time. How they manage their time will become more structured, and you should communicate your expectations regarding flexibility, accountability, accurate time recording, and business requirements to your employees.

Don’t forget about your remote workers and occasional telecommuters! A change from exempt to nonexempt status may also impact those who work from home. Determine whether telecommuting is feasible for your nonexempt employees, and make sure you include an evaluation of measuring time and productivity, as well as ensuring meal and rest breaks are taken appropriately for those employees in states that have defined meal and rest break rules. Communications should include the rules for working overtime, the requirement to take an uninterrupted meal break as mandated by state law, the ability to work flexible hours from home, and method for validating hours worked each pay cycle.

Make your Communications Personal

How the changes in classification status and rates of pay are communicated to employees will have a lot to do with your company culture, pay philosophy, and style of communication. Face-to-face communication is generally ideal method when discussing compensation. Follow up with written documentation confirming your discussion with each impacted employee that shows the new classification status, rate of pay, and the overtime rate of pay that will apply. Some states already require employers to notify nonexempt employees in writing any time a change in rate of pay occurs, including California, District of Columbia, New York, and Pennsylvania.

Most importantly, make sure that you train your management team about the changes you are making, including not just the “what,” “how,” and “when,” but also the “why” so that the company’s intentions are communicated in a way that demonstrates thoughtful consideration of the alternatives, respect for your employees, and alignment with your company’s culture and strategic objectives.

Start now, consider your options carefully, and put your plans together and you’ll be ready to comply with the new FLSA rules by December 1st!

Tags:  nonprofit  non-profits 

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Unique Leadership Opportunities for EDs and Senior Managers

Posted By Rachel Swan, The Greater New Orleans Foundation, Monday, May 23, 2016

The Organizational Effectiveness Initiative at the Greater New Orleans Foundation is pleased to announce registration is open for this year’s sessions of two leadership cohorts hosted in collaboration with CompassPoint Nonprofit Services

 

Please click on the titles to learn more!

 

  • Executive Director Intensive –Designed for Executive Directors in their position more than three years, this three-day cohort session will combine expert instruction and peer-learning to tackle issues faced by organization’s top management with a strong focus on Sustainability-Linking Strategy and Finance and Leadership and Management. Such as how do we powerfully lead our organizations while facing complex leadership challenges?  How do we align our organizations, staff and board around impact as we struggle to achieve financial sustainability?
    • Executive Director Intensive 2016 will occur Wednesday, July 27-Friday, July 29, 2016.
  • Emerging Leaders – a leadership development program with a multicultural framework for nonprofit managers working in southeast Louisiana nonprofit human service organizations.
    • Dates for Emerging Leaders 2016 will span August 2016-January 2017. Please read the program description thoroughly. The application materials are linked towards the end of the program description. 

 

 

Tags:  CompassPoint  Executive Directors  leadership  New Orleans  Nonprofit Training and Toolkits 

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The Unemployment Services Trust (UST) adds CareerArc to its list of member benefits, which helps nonprofits lower claims costs through outplacement and career transition resources.

Posted By Tasha L. Cooper, Louisiana Association of Nonprofit Organizations, Friday, May 20, 2016

UST is pleased to announce its newfound partnership with CareerArc, a one-stop-shop of outplacement tools that helps nonprofits lower unemployment claims costs while establishing goodwill with former employees.

Providing unlimited access to experienced, professional Career Coaches, interactive resume building, networking guides, salary negotiation tips and interview practices tools, UST’s outplacement services provides nonprofits the knowledge they need to mitigate claims liability.

“We understand that nonprofits must make every cent count, especially when working with already limited budgets and resources,” said Donna Groh, Executive Director for UST. “And with CareerArc’s award-winning outplacement platform, we are thrilled to provide this valuable opportunity to our participating nonprofits to help them avoid litigation and boost the confidence levels of their former employees.”

UST’s outplacement platform acts as a customizable support system, designed to make the re-employment process for both nonprofit employers and their employees as painless as possible. Free with UST membership, this newly added service is proven to routinely reduce claims duration by 2-4 weeks or more—helping employees cut their transition time by over 73%.

Because UST already provides its members with the latest HR and claims management resources, including a live HR hotline, e-filing capabilities, 200+ online training courses and one-on-one advice for unemployment claims, the addition of CareerArc’s outplacement services further establishes UST as a holistic solution for nonprofits looking to save time and money.

“We are constantly looking for new ways to help nonprofits streamline their workforce management from start to finish,” said Adam Thorn, Director of Operations. “With the addition of these outplacement services, the UST program will only continue to strengthen the nonprofit sector—acting as both an educational source and an airbag for unforeseen claims matters.”

To find out more about UST and their newly added outplacement platform, please visit www.ChooseUST.orgor contact UST at 1-888-249-4788.

Tags:  Member Rewards Program  nonprofit 

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Emerge Center for Communication, Behavior and Development to Host Free Hearing Loss Seminar

Posted By Lluvia Peveto, The Emerge Center for Communication, Behavior, and Development, Monday, May 16, 2016

 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

5/16/2016

 

Emerge Center for Communication, Behavior and Development to Host Free Hearing Loss Seminar

 

Baton Rouge, La.  -  The Emerge Center for Communication, Behavior and Development will host a free, round-table discussion on hearing loss from 4 to 5 p.m. Thursday, May 26 at their 7784 Innovation Park Drive location in Baton Rouge. Topics will include hearing loss diagnosis, hearing aids, and next steps following a hearing aid fitting.

 

This informal event is open to the public, and complimentary refreshments will be available. No RSVPs are required.

 

The Emerge Center for Communication, Behavior and Development is an independent 501c3 non-profit organization located on the LSU Innovation Park campus, at 7784 Innovation Park Drive, Baton Rouge, LA 70820. Visit http://www.emergela.org/ or call (225) 343-4232 to learn more.

 

Media Contact:  Lluvia Peveto

Phone: (225) 343-4232, ext. 1900

Email: lpeveto@emergela.org


###

Tags:  and Development  audiology  Baton Rouge  Behavior  deaf  deafness  Emerge Center  Emerge Center for Communication  free  health  hearing  hearing loss  hearing screening  Louisiana  nonprofit  seminar  series  support  support group  therapy 

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Nonprofit workshop: Intermediate Grantwriting

Posted By Nora Ellertsen, The Funding Seed, LLC, Monday, May 16, 2016

June nonprofit workshop:

Intermediate Grantwriting
Tuesday, June 7
9:00am-12:00pm
Ashe Cultural Arts Center
1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., New Orleans
Details and registration at www.thefundingseed.com

  

So you've written a few grants and feel like you've got the basics down.  
Are you ready to take your grantwriting to the next level?

 

Intermediate Grantwriting will help you improve your grant proposals and raise more money for your nonprofit.   Through this workshop, you'll learn specific ways to make your proposal more appealing to a funder, including how to make a compelling case to someone unfamiliar with your nonprofit's work and what kind of research and data to include.

 

Registration $40 per person.  Discounts available for students, AmeriCorps members, and organizations registering two or more people.

 

Participants will receive a Certificate of Participation for completing the workshop.


For discount codes or to reserve your space and pay at the door, email info@thefundingseed.com.  For more on services offered by The Funding Seed, visit www.thefundingseed.com.


June nonprofit workshop:

Intermediate Grantwriting
Tuesday, June 7
9:00am-12:00pm
Ashe Cultural Arts Center
1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., New Orleans

So you've written a few grants and feel like you've got the basics down.  
Are you ready to take your grantwriting to the next level?

Intermediate Grantwriting will help you improve your grant proposals and raise more money for your nonprofit.   Through this workshop, you'll learn specific ways to make your proposal more appealing to a funder, including how to make a compelling case to someone unfamiliar with your nonprofit's work and what kind of research and data to include.

Registration $40 per person.  Discounts available for students, AmeriCorps members, and organizations registering two or more people.

Participants will receive a Certificate of Participation for completing the workshop.

For more on services offered by The Funding Seed, visitwww.thefundingseed.com.

June nonprofit workshop:

Intermediate Grantwriting
Tuesday, June 7
9:00am-12:00pm
Ashe Cultural Arts Center
1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., New Orleans

So you've written a few grants and feel like you've got the basics down.  
Are you ready to take your grantwriting to the next level?

Intermediate Grantwriting will help you improve your grant proposals and raise more money for your nonprofit.   Through this workshop, you'll learn specific ways to make your proposal more appealing to a funder, including how to make a compelling case to someone unfamiliar with your nonprofit's work and what kind of research and data to include.

Registration $40 per person.  Discounts available for students, AmeriCorps members, and organizations registering two or more people.

Participants will receive a Certificate of Participation for completing the workshop.

For more on services offered by The Funding Seed, visitwww.thefundingseed.com.

June nonprofit workshop:

Intermediate Grantwriting
Tuesday, June 7
9:00am-12:00pm
Ashe Cultural Arts Center
1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., New Orleans

So you've written a few grants and feel like you've got the basics down.  
Are you ready to take your grantwriting to the next level?

Intermediate Grantwriting will help you improve your grant proposals and raise more money for your nonprofit.   Through this workshop, you'll learn specific ways to make your proposal more appealing to a funder, including how to make a compelling case to someone unfamiliar with your nonprofit's work and what kind of research and data to include.

Registration $40 per person.  Discounts available for students, AmeriCorps members, and organizations registering two or more people.

Participants will receive a Certificate of Participation for completing the workshop.

For more on services offered by The Funding Seed, visitwww.thefundingseed.com.

Tags:  board  board of directors  boards  development  donations  fund  fund development  fund raising  funding  Fundraising  funds  grant  grant writing  grantwriting  leadership  louisiana  Member Event  New Orleans  nonprofit  nonprofit sector  non-profits  sustainability  training  volunteers  workshop  workshop. grants 

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Last chance to register for How to Fire Lousy Board Members

Posted By Kris H. Rutledge, CausePlanet, Monday, May 16, 2016

Don't miss your last opportunity to find out how to take your board members to the next level. Or, how to fire them if they're not working out.

 

If you want to make your board members excellent contributors to your organization, join us on Wednesday!


Register now for CausePlanet's author webinar with Simone Joyaux, author of Firing Lousy Board Members, at 11:00 Central Time at a webinar interview at your desk. This is a

FREE interview for all LANO members. (The link requires LANO network sign-in to register.)

 

Joyaux will touch on the following topics:

  • How can you monitor board members?
  • How can you fire "lousy board members"?
  • What is your governance committee's role in firing and keeping members?
  • How can you craft high expectations to prevent firing people in the first place?
  • How can you recruit quality board members?
  • How can a nonprofit staff empower its board members?

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Your top questions about the Fundraising Intensive Program, ANSWERED!

Posted By Nora Ellertsen, The Funding Seed, LLC, Thursday, April 28, 2016
Have you been wondering whether the Fundraising Intensive Program is right for you?
Check out the answers to these frequently asked questions.


 

1. What is the Fundraising Intensive Program?
The Fundraising Intensive Program is a eight month training program that combines group learning and individual coaching to help bring your nonprofit's fund development to the next level.

During the program, participants meet once a month for a discussion on a shared topic and receive tools and homework assignments related to that topic.  Following this, participants also receive a 90-minute individual coaching session and 30-minute follow-up phone call each month to help them to apply that topic to their own unique organization.  
 
There are two goals of the program: to help your organization to raise immediate funds, and to help you develop lasting skills and habits that allow you to raise more money for the long haul.
 
Course Curriculum:
June- Creating your Fundraising Plan
July- Telling your Story
August- Individual Donors
September- Fundraising Letters and Emails
October- Review month
November- Fundraising Events: House Parties
December- Major Donor Development
January- Staying on Track

Program description and application
2. Why do you have both group and individual sessions?
Combining group and individual learning means that participants can learn from each other in a safe, trusting environment while also getting support from a professional to trouble-shoot issues specific to their own organization. 

Program description and application

 

 

3. What are the sessions like?
The group sessions are discussion-based; there is no PowerPoint and no lecture.  Program members largely work together in small groups, doing practice exercises, reviewing case studies, and sharing lessons learned from personal experience.

The individual sessions allow program members to receive guidance and support implementing ideas from the group sessions at their own unique organizations.  The focus is on making monthly homework assignments meaningful and productive and on monitoring progress towards the goals each participant has created in their personal fundraising plan.

Program description and application
 
4. Why do you make us do homework?  I thought I was done with school!
The Fundraising Intensive Program uses the saying, "Use it or lose it."  It's not just learning about fundraising theoretically; it's about actually making real change in your nonprofit's fund development program.  The homework assignments are all practical and designed to help you truly ingrain the skills we discuss into your own actions and habits.

In addition, the program is designed to help you raise money as you go.  For example, in the month dedicated to fundraising letters and emails, the homework is to write and send a fundraising letter and email.  This means that, if you do your homework, you are actually raising money while the program is happening.

Program description and application
  

 

5. I've already been to a bunch of The Funding Seed's workshops, and it seems like a lot of the topics you cover in this program are the same.  What would I get out of the Fundraising Intensive Program that I wouldn't get from the regular workshop series?
About half of the people who have participated in The Fundraising Intensive Program's first three graduating classes have participated in one or more of The Funding Seed's regular workshops.

The Fundraising Intensive Program provides an entirely different way to learn.  Because participants receive a special individual coaching session every month, you have the opportunity to take the ideas and tools from the group session and work with a professional to help you implement them.  This added accountability means you are more likely to actually do the things you need to do to make real progress.

In addition, because the same participants meet every month, you become a part of a genuine learning community, a group of people who are comfortable sharing ideas and experiences to help everyone fundraise better.

Program description and application

 

 

6. This seems pretty expensive.  Can I justify spending the money for this program?

The Fundraising Intensive Program is an investment, both in terms of time and money.  However, the $250 per month tuition (a second member from the same organization may also participate at a 50% discount) covers more than 40 hours of group and individual coaching, which is significantly less than the cost of similar coaching outside the structure of the program.  In addition, remember that part of the intention of the program is that you will be actively working to raise funds as you go, not just spending money for something you may not ever get around to doing.

Program description and application
 
7. I'm not in New Orleans.  Can I still apply?

You don't have to be based in New Orleans to apply for this program.  However, please be aware that the sessions take place in New Orleans, so you must be able to travel to your sessions every month.

 

Program description and application

 

 

8. Bottom line: Why should I consider doing this program?
If you are ready to make a real leap forward for your nonprofit's fund development efforts, The Fundraising Intensive Program is for you.  Every nonprofit needs to know how to raise money.  Whether you're an Executive Director, development staff,  a board member, a program manager or a volunteer, having the skills to fundraise successfully and sustainably makes you an asset to your organization, and allows your nonprofit to serve your community even more effectively, making the world an even better place for the future.

Have more questions? Email info@thefundingseed.com or call (504) 307-7220.
Or you can read the full program description and apply today!


For more on workshops and other services offered by The Funding Seed, visit www.thefundingseed.com.

Tags:  board  board of directors  development  donations  donor management  donor retention  donors  events  foundations  fund  fund development  fund raising  funding  fundraiser  funds  grant  grant writing  grants  grantwriting  How-To  leadership  Member Event  New Orleans  nonprofit sector  non-profits  online fundraising  setting goals  social fundraising  social media  sustainability  training  volunteers  workshop  workshop. grants 

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Charitable Donations: The World of Quid Pro Quo

Posted By Celeste Viator, Hannis T. Bourgeois, LLP, Thursday, April 28, 2016
 

A contribution to a charity isn't always a tax-deductible contribution for the donor, as in the case of "quid pro quo" donations. This exchange of one thing for another happens when a charity receives a payment that includes a contribution and, in return, provides the donor with goods or services valued for less than the total payment.

For example, a person might make a donation to the fictitious Parakeet Rescue Association of America by buying tickets to the group's charity ball. But he or she gets something back in the form of a "free" gourmet dinner and top-notch entertainment. Only the amount over and above the value of the dinner and entertainment is considered a charitable contribution.

Acknowledgment and Disclosure

Quid pro quo arrangements create an obligation for the charity: You may ignore payments of less than $75, but if your organization receives more than $75 and provides a benefit to the donor, you must advise the donor that it's a quid pro quo contribution.

With such contributions, donors can deduct only the amount in excess of the value of the goods or services they receive in return. And the charity must put in writing:

  • That the amount of any tax deductible contribution is limited to the excess of the contribution over the value of the goods and services provided in return, and

     

  • A good faith estimate of the value of the goods or services provided in return.

    The written acknowledgment must be provided when the donation is solicited or when it's received. For example, if you're holding a charity dinner each ticket sold should disclose the tax-deductible portion of the ticket price.

    Additionally, the disclosure must be in a readily visible format — in other words, no small print. Examples can be found in IRS Publication 1771, "Charitable Contributions — Substantiation and Disclosure Requirements."

    Your organization could be penalized for failing to furnish the proper acknowledgment and disclosure. Fines are $10 per contribution, not to exceed $5,000 for the fundraising event.

    The Quid Pro Quo Amount

    A key task for the charity is to value the goods or services. Let's say your organization takes a group of supporters to a high—end restaurant and pays for their meals. The supporters then make large donations. Determining quid pro quo is fairly simple in such cases: The amount your organization paid for the meal would be considered the fair market value, and only the amount of the contributions in excess of this value would be a tax—deductible contribution for the donor.

    It's not as easy when some of the items given away have been donated to your organization. What would happen, for example, if your charity put on a gala dinner with live music, and the banquet facility charged you a reduced amount for the food as its contribution, and the band performed at no cost?

    To establish the value to be reported to the donor, you must determine what it would cost someone to attend a similar event. In this instance, you'd need to research comparable costs at local restaurants or hotels for a dinner with entertainment. Or you could ask the banquet facility and the band to provide you with the value of the food and services they provided at no cost.

    Charity Auctions

    All items auctioned at a charity auction (silent or regular) must have a value placed on them. The charity should ask the donor to put a value on the item unless it's readily apparent, such as with a $50 gift certificate. The value should be the amount that a willing buyer would pay for the item in an "arm's length" transaction — that is, in the marketplace.

    The charity can then publish the item's value on bid cards or in a catalog of auction items. This serves as the acknowledgment, and the buyers will be entitled to a deduction for the amount paid in excess of that value.

    When Reporting Is Unnecessary

    There are a few instances when quid pro quo reporting isn't necessary:

  • Token exception. The contribution is for $52 or more and the goods cost less than $10.50, or the value of the benefit to the donor doesn't exceed 2% of the donation or $105, whichever is less,

     

  • Membership exception. Membership benefits (such as free admission or free parking) are provided, but the annual membership fee is $75 or less, and

     

  • Intangible religious exception. Religious benefits, such as religious services or classes, are provided by an organization operated exclusively for religious purposes (excluding travel, education and consumer goods).

    In other situations, it's safer to report quid pro quo than not.

    Crossing All the Ts

    Holding fundraising events is a sure-fire way to supplement your organization's income. But you need to understand your reporting obligations if you're providing goods or services in return. Talk to your tax adviser about your specific events and how you should disclose the details.

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Don't miss our author webinar on firing lousy board members

Posted By Kris H. Rutledge, CausePlanet, Wednesday, April 27, 2016

Find out about all the steps to take before firing a board member. And if they don’t work, how can you best fire someone?

Webinar with Simone Joyaux

Join CausePlanet founder Denise McMahan and Simone Joyaux Wednesday, May 18, at 11:00 Central Time at a webinar interview at your desk.

 

Joyaux will touch on the following topics:

  • How can you monitor board members?
  • How can you fire "lousy board members"?
  • What is your governance committee's role in firing and keeping members?
  • How can you craft high expectations to prevent firing people in the first place?
  • How can you recruit quality board members?
  • How can a nonprofit staff empower its board members?

 Register

 

Register now for this FREE interview for all LANO members. (The link requires LANO network sign-in to register.)

 

See more

 

See more with the Page to Practice™ summary of Joyaux’s book:

 

·      Simply log in at the top right corner of CausePlanet’s home page (www.causeplanet.org) and fill in your registered email with LANO and “Password1”.

·      Click on “Summary Library” to see Firing Lousy Board Members and more titles.

 

 

Tags:  author webinar  CausePlanet  Page to Practice 

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