Print Page   |   Contact Us   |   Your Cart   |   Sign In   |   Join LANO!
Search LANO.org
Member News & Events Blog
Blog Home All Blogs
Sharing the news, tips, press releases, special offers and upcoming events posted by LANO members. Share your good news here! Feel free to cross post the blog links to your Facebook or other media pages, or to email them directly to friends.Please allow 1-2 business days for your blog to appear on the network.

 

Search all posts for:   

 

Top tags: Fundraising  nonprofit  non-profits  New Orleans  fund development  CausePlanet  training  workshop  fund raising  grants  louisiana  funding  nonprofit sector  Page to Practice  development  donations  donors  grantwriting  funds  fund  grant writing  sustainability  grant  Member Event  Execute Now!  Finance Fundamentals  boards  workshop. grants  volunteers  events 

Grantwriting For Beginners on June 7

Posted By Nora Ellertsen, The Funding Seed, LLC, 21 hours ago

Grantwriting for Beginners
Thursday, June 7
9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
Ashe Power House Theater
1731 Baronne St., New Orleans

Are you involved with a nonprofit?
Does your job require you to raise funds for your department or position?
Do you want to add a valuable skill to your resume?

Consider grantwriting!

Grantwriting for Beginners is an engaging workshop that gives you the basic tools you need to start writing grants. Participants will learn how to find funding opportunities, tools and tips for writing proposals and ways to make a program competitive for repeat funding.

Attendees will receive a Certificate of Participation after completing the workshop.

Registration $40 per person. Discounts available for students, AmeriCorps members and organizations registering two or more people.

 

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

For more on workshops and other services from The Funding Seed, visit www.thefundingseed.com. Email info@thefundingseed.com to inquire about discount codes or to reserve your space and pay at the door.

Tags:  development  donations  donors  events  fund development  fund raising  funding  Fundraising  funds  grant  grant writing  grants  grantwriting  Member Event  New Orleans  nonprofit  nonprofit sector  non-profits  training  workshop  workshop. grants 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Get the Money You Need

Posted By Celeste Viator, Hannis T. Bourgeois, LLP, Wednesday, May 23, 2018

You know the drill: It's midnight and your grant proposal is due tomorrow. Your assistant left hours ago, and the words on the computer screen start to blur. "It's not worth it," you think. And besides, only a few grants pan out anyway. 

 

Grants are a big part of the not-for-profit world. And yet, according to Dennis P. McIlnay's book, How Foundations Work, less than 10 percent of grant proposals are ever funded. That's probably why grant writing is often viewed as a lottery with little hope of success.

But it doesn't have to be that way. Here are a few pointers to make the grant-writing process a little easier:

 

Know your organization. In your proposal, you need to prove your organization has a significant need and then come up with a solution to solve the problems. The more information you have at hand, the easier it is to answer questions on a grant proposal. Ask relevant staff members questions about your organization's programs, and use their answers to help write the proposals. If your employees have trouble providing answers you need, your organization may need to think through its ideas or document its experience more carefully.

 

Set up a system. The requirements of grant applications are generally repetitive and predictable. Invest some time coordinating and preparing clerical material. You will find that with an efficient system, it's just as easy to apply for 10 or 20 grants as it is to apply for one or two. And the more organized you are, the easier it becomes to tailor each proposal to the specific grant. Before getting started, contact individual grantmakers for their exact application specifications, Requests for Proposals (RFPs) and guidelines. 

Build relationships. Experienced grant writers send a steady stream of information to funders to show that their organizations are responsible and effective partners. Relationships can be cultivated in a variety of other ways, from personal meetings to an invitation to an event sponsored by the local Chamber of Commerce. These contacts give funders a way to develop a positive profile of your organization and to see that you will use their funds responsibly.

Work steadily. Don't wait until you're desperate. Steady, year-round grant seeking lets you gain control over the process. It also gives you the opportunity to carefully select who you will approach as a potential funder and how much to ask for. When you start from a position of power, you come across as a more secure investment. 

Learn your craft. Like most skills, grant writing takes time to learn and can be frustrating at first. But keep doing research and writing proposals. Good writing skills are very important. The more you do, the better you become at crafting a good proposal. 

The pay-off for the time you spend? An effective grant-seeking system that can speed and enhance your organization's future work. 

 

This post has not been tagged.

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Nonprofit Fundraising 101 - SPECIAL LANO DISCOUNT!

Posted By Nora Ellertsen, The Funding Seed, LLC, Wednesday, May 9, 2018
Updated: Wednesday, May 16, 2018

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER AND ENTER CODE LANO2018 FOR 15% OFF

 

Nonprofit Fundraising 101

Thursday, May 17, 1:30 - 4:30pm
Ashe Power House Teater
1731 Baronne St.
New Orleans, LA 70113

Every nonprofit needs to know the options for how it will raise money. This workshop will give you the essential background you need in order to keep your work well-funded.

Participants will learn:
Where nonprofits get their funding.
Why your nonprofit might choose to prioritize fundraising from grants, individual donors, events, and other sources.
What it means to make your funding sustainable.
The difference between restricted and unrestricted funding.
The Donor Cultivation Cycle- the framework for identifying and building relationships with your donors and funders.

This workshop is ideal for both for those new to the fundraising and nonprofit world and for those with some experience in fund development.

Registration $40 per person. Discounts available for students, AmeriCorps members, and organizations registering two or more people.

Participants will receive a Certificate of Participation for completing the workshop.\

 

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

For more on services offered by The Funding Seed, visit www.thefundingseed.com. To reserve your space and pay at the door, or for any questions, please email info@thefundingseed.com.

Tags:  CausePlanet  development  donations  donors  fund development  fund raising  funding  Fundraising  funds  grants  louisiana  New Orleans  nonprofit  nonprofit sector  non-profits  Page to Practice  sustainability  training  workshop 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Board Building Done Right

Posted By Sarah Cortell Vandersypen, CFRE, Philanthropic Partners, Monday, May 7, 2018

From job descriptions to strategic recruiting to ongoing training, board development is critical to your nonprofit. Your board should be your biggest advocates, and if it’s an all-volunteer organization, your board serves as your core staff.

So how do you go about getting the right board members to help your organization meet its strategic objectives?

Job Descriptions. This is key. A job description allows you and potential board members to be on the same page on expectations from both sides. BoardSource and The Bridgespan Group have great templates that you can customize to fit your organization.

Conduct a Board Audit. To recruit strategically, you need to understand your strengths and weaknesses of your current board. Are you missing a key demographic group? Do you have board members with critical expertise like financial management? This AFP white paper can be a good guiding document in assessing your current board.

Get Rid of Dead Weight. I have seen new board members come onto a board with new energy and ideas to only be shut down and shut out by board members that no longer helpful to the organization. They are creating a toxic environment. Those new board members also see other members that don’t contribute (financially, meeting attendance, engagement, etc.), which enforces the idea that they don’t have to contribute either. Clean up your board before you bring on new members.

Have an Honest Conversation. Board recruitment is sort of like dating. You should go out to coffee or lunch with a prospective board member and get to know them. What are they passionate about? How much do they know about your organization? Lay out the expectations of board members. Be honest about the opportunities that your organization has to grow/improve. Don’t play Old Maid with your board by which I mean don’t hide your “Old Maid” (your major challenge(s) – financial troubles, decreasing program quality, etc.) until the unsuspecting member joins. It’s not professional and people won’t stick with your organization if they feel roped into this without full knowledge.

Orientation and Ongoing Training. All board members should go through orientation. This can be as long or formal as your organization needs. National Council of Nonprofits has a sample agenda. BoardSource has additional resources. But don’t leave your board members to find their own way throughout their term. Continue giving them training and resources to help them do their jobs better!

 

Do you need help build a fundraising board? Are your board members afraid to fundraise? Let's talk.

Tags:  board  Board of Directors  boards  fund development  fundraising 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Join the Fundraising Intensive class of 2019!

Posted By Nora Ellertsen, The Funding Seed, LLC, Wednesday, May 2, 2018
Updated: Wednesday, May 2, 2018

The Funding Seed's Fundraising Intensive Program is an eight month course that gives you tools to raise funds for your nonprofit.  Through a combination of group learning and one-on-one coaching, participants learn best practices and practical skills related to a range of fundraising activities.

 

Over the course of the program, the nonprofit staff, board members, and volunteers involved will learn about:
Fundraising Planning
Telling Your Story
Individual Donor Development
Major Donor Development
Fundraising Events: House Parties
Fundraising by Mail and Email

Each month, participants come together for a group learning session facilitated by The Funding Seed and dedicated to a scheduled fundraising topic.  Group members engage in discussion, share ideas, learn industry best practices, and receive practical tools and homework assignments related to that topic.  Following the session, each nonprofit receives 90 minutes of in-person, individual coaching with The Funding Seed focused on implementing those tools, plus an additional 30-minute private check-in call.  By joining in both a group learning session and supportive individual coaching, participants have the opportunity to receive well-rounded training that makes real change at their own nonprofits.

The program is designed to allow participants to raise money as they go.  For example, during the month dedicated to fundraising by mail and email, class members write real fundraising appeals for their organizations.  As a result, nonprofits that participate in the program learn how to make their fundraising successful for the long term while also raising immediate funds.

Following completion of the program, participants receive their Certificate of Graduation.

 

CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE

 

Participation is limited and applications are required.  If you are interested in joining The Funding Seed's Fundraising Intensive Program for its 2018-2019 class, please click the button above and complete the following application by Friday, May 11 at 5:00 p.m.  For questions, please call (504) 307-7220 or email info@thefundingseed.com. For more information on The Funding Seed's other offerings, please visit www.thefundingseed.com 

 

Tags:  boards  development  donations  donor management  donor retention  donors  Finance Fundamentals  fund  fund development  fund raising  funding  fundraiser  Fundraising  funds  LANO Network  New Orleans  nonprofit  nonprofit sector  non-profits  Page to Practice  sustainability  training 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Audits Are Essential to Your Organization's Health

Posted By Celeste Viator, Hannis T. Bourgeois, LLP, Thursday, April 26, 2018

Audits have become more important due to increased public and government scrutiny of not-for-profit organizations, their management and their boards. Audits not only provide you with a fair assessment of your organization's financial health, but also can reveal vulnerabilities such as weak internal controls, insufficient cash reserves and poor investment policies. Perhaps most important, regular audits reassure your donors, members and other stakeholders that you run a fit organization.

 

Ins and Outs 

Audits come in two forms, serving different purposes:

1. Internal audit. This type of audit is a function of your board's fiduciary responsibility to the organization and is performed by an "inside" auditor, such as your CFO.

The auditor examines whether your financial policies and processes meet your standards and those of outside agencies, and may look at how well your nonprofit's accounting and financial policies accord with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and applicable state and federal laws. The auditor also may review the accuracy of financial information, assess how efficiently your organization handles money matters and test your internal controls. 

2. External audit. An external audit is conducted by a financial professional outside of your nonprofit. This type of audit is completely separate from an internal audit. Although external audits are optional for not-for-profits in some states, they're required in others. Be sure you learn the rules in your state.

 

In an external audit, a CPA examines your organization's financial statements and issues an opinion on whether those statements offer a fair picture of your finances and adhere to GAAP. To support this opinion, the auditor tests underlying records such as your not-for-profit's bank reconciliations, accounts payable records and contribution classifications. The auditor also evaluates your organization's internal controls.

It's essential to choose an external auditor who has no ties to your organization. For example, a board member's spouse who happens to be a CPA — no matter how qualified the spouse may otherwise be to perform an audit — wouldn't be able to accept an engagement to perform your audit.

 

Committee Work

Another major component of the not-for-profit audit process is your organization's audit committee — financially knowledgeable people who provide oversight of your organization's reporting and internal controls. Some states mandate who can serve on an audit committee. Others allow board members, as well as non-board member volunteers, to serve. Depending on the size and complexity of the not-for-profit organization, the committee generally has three to five members. 

The audit committee's primary role, besides selecting external auditors, is to maintain open communication with internal and external auditors to discuss audit processes and results. The committee also should ensure internal controls are in place throughout the year. The key to a successful audit committee is its independence and ability to bring to the table financial expertise specifically related to nonprofits. 

Preparing for an Audit

To help ensure you get the most useful results from an external audit, assemble relevant documents, including financial statements, bank correspondence, budgets, board meeting minutes, payroll, accounts receivable and accounts payable records. Your auditor also may ask to review records related to loans, leases, grants, donations and fundraising activities. Ask your auditor for a detailed list of required documentation. 

Expect the auditor to ask questions during the review process. He or she also will want to question board or staff members about your internal controls — including procedures for fraud prevention and detection. Among the issues likely to be reviewed are how money and other resources are received and spent, what the organization does to comply with applicable laws, and how financial transactions are recorded. 

Ideally, you should keep a running file of appropriate paperwork so you're prepared when the audit takes place. You also should communicate with your auditor as questions arise during the year about, for example, launching a program to sell items to raise funds or accepting a large grant. This ongoing approach can make the annual audit smoother and faster. 

Good Reasons

Audits take considerable time and effort, but if they reveal serious issues, such as fraud, they're well worth it. If that isn't enough incentive, consider the government's growing interest in not-for-profit audits. Although the revised IRS Form 990 doesn't mandate them, it does ask organizations to discuss their audit activities, as well as the role their boards play in them.

 

 

This post has not been tagged.

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

2018 Semaine de la Francophonie Creative Placemaking Summit

Posted By George Marks, NUNU Arts and Culture Collective, Thursday, April 12, 2018

Creative placemaking is a planning process that places arts at the center of shaping the character and vitality of neighborhoods, cities, towns, and regions. It is an innovative approach to advancing the planning objectives of livability, sustainability, and equity.

Join us. Gather information and return home empowered. Adapt to your community's unique and authentic character.

 

Tags:  Register now 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Grow Your Individual and Major Gifts Fundraising

Posted By Sarah Cortell Vandersypen, CFRE, Philanthropic Partners, Monday, April 9, 2018

Did you know that donations from individuals make up 72% of all charitable giving in the US (Giving USA 2017)?

 

Is your individual fundraising performing well? Do you want to find new ways to grow your individual fundraising? Do you not know how to approach a face-to-face solicitation?

 

In the upcoming workshop, Individual & Major Gifts, on April 18, you will learn how to develop an individual donor program and moves management strategy. We'll close direct mail, annual fund, membership programs, and major gifts. A special focus on major gifts will help you secure transformational gifts for your organization.

 

Lunch and training materials are included in your workshop fee. Attendees will receive a Certificate of Participation for completing the workshop.

 

Discounts are available for students and organizations registering two or more people.

 

Register here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/individual-majors-gifts-tickets-42447907835

 

--

 

About Philanthropic Partners

Sarah Cortell Vandersypen, CFRE is the founder of Philanthropic Partners, a Baton Rouge-based consulting firm servicing nonprofit organizations. She specializes in building a development program from the ground up, diversifying revenue streams, and enhancing a culture of philanthropy through board and staff training and coaching. More information about Philanthropic Partners can be found at www.philanthropic-partners.com.

    

Tags:  fund development  fundraising  nonprofit  workshop 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Non-Profit Application Workshop

Posted By Katelyn Smith, Louisiana Association of Nonprofit Organizations, Monday, April 2, 2018

Serve Louisiana, formerly Louisiana Delta Service Corps is currently seeking non-profit organizations to partner with for the upcoming 2018-19 service term. The work that nonprofits, public schools, grassroots efforts and community initiatives do to improve lives across South Louisiana is critical. And since 1991, Serve Louisiana has helped a diverse group of organizations grow their mission and deepen their impact by partnering them with smart, energetic young leaders who have a passion for service.

 

Our AmeriCorps members serve full time for 11 months starting September 1st. They work on capacity building projects encompassing volunteer recruitment and management, technology and social media, community outreach and program design and evaluation.

Serve Louisiana is seeking organizations that will offer a meaningful service opportunity, provide excellent mentorship and training experiences and help develop the future leaders of our community.

 

Partner Organizations pay a one-time cash match of $10,000 per member. This helps offset the cost of the member’s living allowance ($14,000), health insurance, member training, and education award ($5,920).

 

If you are interested in learning more about hosting an AmeriCorps member please attend one of our application workshops in either Baton Rouge or New Orleans. We will review the entire application, the timeline for submission and corps member recruitment and the benefits and responsibilities for hosting a member. Please rsvp to lisa@servelouisiana.org if you are interested in attending. Applications will be available on our website starting April 9th and will be due to us on April 30th.

 

Baton Rouge

April 9th 1-3 Goodwood Library (room 102)

 

New Orleans

April 12th 10:30-12:30 Keller Library 

This post has not been tagged.

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

2018 Semaine de la Francophonie Creative Placemaking Summit

Posted By George Marks, NUNU Arts and Culture Collective, Thursday, March 29, 2018

 

Be part of this regional endeavor to introduce neighboring communities to ongoing Creative Placemaking work throughout Acadiana, and to each other, and join in workshops that seek to assist with shaping projects that better YOUR community, town and/or city.
 
During these five days you will hear from leading experts in the study and practice of Creative Placemaking. You will participate in discussions designed to assist with a fuller and working understanding of how to implement Creative Placemaking.
Sunday, April 22 - NUNU Arts and Culture Collective, Arnaudville
Monday, April 23 – Sliman Performing Arts Center, New Iberia
Tuesday, April 24 – Abbey Players Theater, Abbeville
Wednesday, April 25 – St. John Episcopal Church, Washington
Thursday, April 26 – Acadiana Center for the Arts, Lafayette
Creative Placemaking is all about the transformation of communities and neighborhoods via art and/or culture centered projects that result in places where people want to live and visit. It is about inclusion and partnership building, and the want for an improved quality of life.
 
While this summit is certainly something that community and organizational leaders, public officials, decision makers, municipal and economic planners, and innovators in arts and culture would find beneficial - you need not be one who is considered a leader to affect change

 

For more information and/or to register, visit: semaine-francaise-arnaudville.org

 

 

 Attached Thumbnails:

Tags:  SAVE the Dates 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 
Page 1 of 99
1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6  >   >>   >| 
Association Management Software Powered by YourMembership  ::  Legal